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DorsaVi technology at Rivervale Physiotherapy

DorsaVi technology at Rivervale Physiotherapy

DorsaVi technology is now available at Move Well Physiotherapy at our Rivervale Physio clinic as well as at our Duncraig physio clinic, Warwick clinic and our Apsley Road clinic in Willeton.

When you phone to make the appointment, make sure you ask specifically for the ViMove assessment. Book in to see exactly how your spine and pelvis are moving in one session. Longer assessments can be arranged with discussions with your Move Well Rivervale physiotherapist.

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Non-Specific Low Back Pain

Non-Specific Low Back Pain

Physiotherapy can be successful in the treatment of non-specific low back pain, and evidence of this can be found in the Australian Physiotherapy Association’s Low Back Pain Position Statement. Move Well Physiotherapists are up to date with current research in the area of non-specific low back pain and the APA Low Back Pain Position Statement.

Research Evidence

There is evidence to suggest that physiotherapy treatment in a variety of forms can be beneficial in the treatment of acute, sub-acute and chronic low back pain. Physiotherapy assessment can often pinpoint the structures causing the pain and allow early commencement of appropriate treatment and rehabilitation to improve the condition.

Classification of Non-Specific Low Back Pain

There are many classifications for non-specific low back pain. Often it can be difficult to determine the exact source of the pain. Non-specific low back pain may be wide spread, diffuse, achey, or even have some sharp sensations with movement. Sometimes there may be referred leg pain when the low back pain is bad. Pain may be aggaravated by standing and walking, or bending and sitting.

Physiotherapy Treatment of Non-Specific Low Back Pain

The Physiotherapist will use clinical reasoning skills to determine the likely source or causes of the non-specific low back pain. The patient may require hands on treatment to mobilise stiff joints, stretch tight tissues, and mobilise neural structures. Specific exercise prescription may be required to retrain the lumbar spine stabilising muscles and generally strengthen and mobilise the spine. Other exercises may be commenced to retrain movement patterns to take pressure off the painful structures and teach the patient to move in the most efficient manner. The physiotherapist will also encourage patient self management so the patient can be responsible for the daily completion of their exercise program to ensure the chance of re-injury is reduced.

Contact us at one of our Movewell Clinic Locations if we can assist.

(c) Move Well Pty Ltd

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Patello-Femoral Joint Pain

Patello-Femoral Joint Pain

Patello-femoral joint pain is thought to be a major component in over 80% of all knee pain.

Patello-femoral joint pain can occur in both children and adults and usually responds extremely well to physiotherapy treatment. Scientific research has confirmed that physiotherapy intervention is the most effective long-term solution for kneecap pain.
Approximately 90% of patello-femoral syndrome sufferers will be pain-free within six weeks of starting a physiotherapist guided rehabilitation program. For those who fails to respond, surgery may be required to repair any severely damaged joint surfaces.

Presentation
The patient will usually present with medial knee pain of gradual onset. Patello-femoral pain can also refer to the lateral, inferior and posterior knee regions. There will be tenderness of the medial patella facet (underneath the patella), and they will complain of pain with squat, standing up after prolonged sitting, and pain particularly walking up and down stairs. Children may complain of knee pain during or after sport. Often in children there has been a change in activity levels or a growth spurt associated with the increase in knee pain.

Observation
Usually the vastus medialis oblique muscle (the VMO on the inside of the knee) will be small and weak on the side of the knee pain, and this muscle is responsible for maintaining some medial glide of the patella during functional activities. If the VMO is weak, the patella tracks laterally which can lead to pain, compression and even subluxation/dislocation. The VMO is also inhibited immediately with the onset of knee pain, so patello-femoral joint symptoms can occur some time after an acute knee injury that was initially unrelated to the patello-femoral joint.

Treatment
Treatment of patello-femoral joint pain includes patella taping, appropriate stretches and strengthening exercises to correct lower limb muscle imbalances, orthotics if indicated, and localised patella mobilisations to stretch the tight lateral tissues (including the ITB). This treatment approach is often referred to as the McConnell’s treatment regime. Sometimes there is an associated hip weakness or hip tightness on the same side which allows the leg to internally rotate too much during activity which places stress on the knee and results in patello-femoral pain. Your physiotherapist will also check your hip biomechanics and mobilise the hip if required and give you appropriate strengthening exercises to improve your general biomechanics.

Contact us at one of our Movewell Clinic Locations if we can assist.

(c) Move Well Pty Ltd

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Swimmers Shoulder

Swimmers Shoulder

Swimmers Shoulder is a general term used to describe impingement pain occurring at the shoulder as a result of swimming.

Swimmers Shoulder can occur in both social and serious swimmers and is not an uncommon problem, with the USA Olympic team in the 1980’s having more than 90% of their squad affected by swimmers shoulder at the one time.

What is Swimmers Shoulder?
Swimmers Shoulder is pain occurring around the front shoulder region as the result of repetitive overuse with usually the overhead strokes (freestyle, butterfly and backstroke). The major contributing factor is often restricted internal rotation of the glenohumeral joint that leads to over protraction of the shoulder complex to compensate for this decreased range during the pull through. Swimmers shoulder (impingement pain) can also occur at other points through the range, and a thorough biomechanical assessment of the upper quadrant (cervical spine and shoulder joint complex) is required for an accurate diagnosis.

Physiotherapy Assessment
Physiotherapy assessment takes into account the aggravating movement to assist with diagnosis of the biomechanical faults leading to the problem. There is often an upper cervical spine component to the injury (due to breathing crookedly to one side with freestyle, or due to excessive upper cervical extension with butterfly), and therefore the cervical and thoracic spines must also be assessed. The scalene muscles of the neck are often tight, and the C1/2 joint complex (50% of rotation occurs here) is often stiff. Shoulder joint rotation is also a key factor, and the Hawkins Kennedy Impingement tests are usually positive. Good thoracic extension range is also a requirement of correct biomechanical form while swimming and thoracic spine stiffness can also be a contributing factor. Decreased hip extension range can also put increased pressure onto the back and therefore the shoulder.

Treatment
Localised treatment to the area of pain to settle inflamed or irritated soft tissues is the first aim of physiotherapy treatment. However, treatment to correct the underlying biomechanical faults must commence as soon as possible to prevent further aggravation and to prevent future reccurrence of the injury. Sometimes, the swimmer must have some time out of the water to enable healing of the swollen or injured structures, but at other times, modified swimming training is able to be continued. Stroke correction may also be required and the physiotherapist will liase with the coach to discuss what components of the stroke are leading to the shoulder pain so stroke correction can be specifically concerned with preventing the condition from returning.

Contact us at one of our Movewell Clinic Locations if we can assist.

(c) Move Well Pty Ltd

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